Pula!

Pula literally means “rain” in Setswana. It’s the name of the currency, it’s on the coat of arms and when people celebrate, they yell PULA! People wish for pula and it’s a great blessing when it rains. As I wrap up my last day in Botswana, I am celebrating. I’m cheering PULA for the people I’ve…

Muito bem obrigado en Mozambique

This past weekend, my good friend Marie and I went to Mozambique. I’ve been chirping about this trip for months and was so excited to escape to the beach for a few days. While there, I had plenty of time to think and think I did. I thought about how excited I was to see my…

Teaching Teachers, or Something Like That

I am a teacher (duh). And the participants were teachers. So, even though it was a workshop, I was technically teaching teachers. All my teacher friends know that this is no small feat. Teachers are amazing creatures. Some of the most brilliant people in the world are teachers. Because I’m a teacher, I can say…

What it’s like to be sick when you’re abroad

I’m sick. I’m not dying but if you know me then you know how dramatic I can be so I might as well be dying. Because there is literally nothing more exciting than documenting my week of ills, here is a recap. (To my sister–I told you more exciting posts were coming!) It started last…

Notes from the field: Oodima Junior Secondary School

Well, after a weekend of debauchery in the bush with the hash, getting back to reality actually felt pretty good. This week, I spent time at my very last (gassppppp, I can’t get over that it’s April already!) school—Oodima JSS in Oodi, Botswana. Now, Oodi to Americans (at least to me) sounds like it should…

Notes from the Field: Tlokweng Junior Secondary School

How is it almost April?! Before I left, people would often say to me, “How are you going to make it five months, away from home? Away from Jerry?” I’d always reply that five months really isn’t that long of time period (I was however very concerned about the Jerry part). Time has been something…

Serowe

HOLY CATS, THREE BLOG POSTS IN 24 HOURS?!?!?!?! That’s what happens when you feel like you need to get your life together–you start with the easiest thing on your to-do list. As mentioned just yesterday in the Tour de Botswana, Part II post, we were invited back to Serowe for an extended day of learning….

Notes from the field: St. Joseph’s College

Whewwwww…time is flying and I’m already at the half way mark of my time in Botswana. After all the roadtrippin’, I returned to my scheduled school visits last week by visiting one of the best in the nation, St. Joseph’s College. Located on the outskirts of Gaborone (only a 15 minute drive from my apartment),…

Tour de Botswana, Part II

Wednesday: Shakawe to Maun via Etsha 6 and Gumare After a whirlwind day in Etsha 6 on Tuesday, we woke up and had breakfast at Drotsky’s Lodge on the Okavango River near Shakawe. As previously mentioned, we stayed at some pretty great places along our adventure. This beautiful lodge was no exception. As I walked down…

Tour de Botswana, Part I

Like the great cycle ride through the country of France, I, too, experienced a great trek last week. Only, it wasn’t in France and I certainly didn’t bike. Thanks to the Fulbright Professional Development Grant and the MOE, both Maya and I (along with Ednah and Jobe, the Social Studies Advisor) were able to travel…

Speed bumps and Safaris

We all have that one special friend. You know, the kind that brings you a caramel latte when you’ve had a bad day, dreams about traveling the world more than you do, adopts you into their family, brings gas-x to every volleyball game you coach and talks the most crap out of anyone at your…

Notes from the field: Kgari Sechele II Senior Secondary

After a week spent in the UB library, it was exciting to visit another school this week. I love exploring areas outside of Gaborone and thankfully, this week I was in Molepolole. Molepolole is the largest village in the country. At nearly 68,000 people, it sits northwest of Gaborone and is home to one of the…